Drapery Workroom Price – Installing Blinds On Windows.

Drapery Workroom Price

drapery workroom price

    workroom

  • room where work is done
  • Also known as the volunteer or PTA workroom, where volunteers can work on projects.   Located next to Mr. Davis' office on the side of the gym.
  • A room for working in, esp. one equipped for a particular kind of work
  • Used in Library Catalogue records to indicate that the item has been removed from the shelves, usually because it is in need of repair. If the item can be repaired it will be returned to the shelves. If it is beyond repair, it will either be replaced or withdrawn from stock.

    drapery

  • Cloth coverings hanging in loose folds
  • Long curtains of heavy fabric
  • curtain: hanging cloth used as a blind (especially for a window)
  • The artistic arrangement of clothing in sculpture or painting
  • Drapery is a general word referring to cloths or textiles (Old French drap, from Late Latin drappus ). It may refer to cloth used for decorative purposes – such as around windows – or to the trade of retailing cloth, originally mostly for clothing, formerly conducted by drapers.
  • cloth gracefully draped and arranged in loose folds

    price

  • Decide the amount required as payment for (something offered for sale)
  • determine the price of; "The grocer priced his wares high"
  • monetary value: the property of having material worth (often indicated by the amount of money something would bring if sold); "the fluctuating monetary value of gold and silver"; "he puts a high price on his services"; "he couldn't calculate the cost of the collection"
  • the amount of money needed to purchase something; "the price of gasoline"; "he got his new car on excellent terms"; "how much is the damage?"

drapery workroom price – A complete

A complete course in millinery; twenty-four practical lessons detailing the processes for mastering the art of millinery; a text book for teachers of millinery. A guide for the millinery workroom
A complete course in millinery; twenty-four practical lessons detailing the processes for mastering the art of millinery; a text book for teachers of millinery. A guide for the millinery workroom
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR’d book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

E.M. Trevor & Son Ltd High Street Weston-Super-Mare

E.M. Trevor & Son Ltd High Street Weston-Super-Mare
Article Published in the Illustrated Bristol News 1962.

THE FASHION HOUSE OF E. M. TREVOR and Son Ltd. is a firm conscious of the part it has played in setting the trend of fashion for women in Weston-super-Mare for almost 60 years. And, perhaps even more important, it is very much aware of the role it plays today as a store with a reputation for supplying the best in women’s clothes to a discriminating clientele.

So insistent is the present Managing Director, Mr. Reginald Trevor, that his business should offer the best and most up-to-date service that he travels regularly to all parts of the world bringing back ideas and innovations from leading salons and stores in many countries.

To trace the history of Trevors is really to trace the development of fashion in the present century. The changing styles, the changing lengths of dress have all been reflected in the windows of the store in High Street over the years.

The firm started, on its present site but in smaller premises, in 1904. The founder was Mr. Edward Morris Trevor, later to become Mayor of Weston. He trained in the fashion business in London, working with leading firms of the day such as Bradley’s of Chepstow Place, and Thomas Wallis of Holborn.

He first came to Weston to work for a firm in the town but soon saw that there was an opening for another general drapery and fashion store, and decided to go into business on his own.

So it was that he bought an estate agent’s office in High Street and the name of E. M. Trevor became a part of the business life of the town for the first time.

Mr. Trevor worked hard in those early years to build up his business. He was helped by his wife, who had been a buyer for another large London firm. It was not long before it became obvious that extensions to the original premises were needed.

The early success of the business is undoubtedly accounted for by the fact that Mr. Trevor foresaw the trend in the fashion business towards ready made clothes.

This was at a time when any garment not tailor made was considered very inferior. But Mr. Trevor made a point in specialising in good quality off-the-peg fashions.

In 1911 the shop premises were enlarged by additions at the rear. Just ten years later there were even more drastic improvements as the business continued to flourish, in spite of the interruption of World War One.

It was during the alterations carried out in 1921, when the premises were entirely re-built, that the business began to specialise in fashions to the exclusion of the drapery business. It was at this time, too, that the popular show window arcade in front of the shop came into being just another example of the forward looking policy of the company.

In 1927 there were further improvements to the store and the switch to fashion specialisation was completed.

By this time the founder of the business had trained his son Reginald to join him in running the store. After some six years experience with the leading firms in both London and Paris, he returned to Weston to become a partner in what then became E. M. Trevor and Son.

Mr. Edward Trevor remained actively interested in the firm he had founded right until his death in 1942. But in the last ten years of his life he also entered into the life of Weston-super-Mare, serving on the town Council and helping to found the Victoria Bowling Club. He was also a patron of rugby football and swimming in the town. He was made Mayor in 1941 and again in the following year, but died during his second term of office.

But the founder had lived to see the completion in 1939 of further extensions to his premises. The re-building and modemisation which took place then gave the premises their present form although the interior was completely refitted again in 1950.

The premises survived the war almost unmarked, and immediately after the war achieved some fame by becoming the first firm to stage mannequin parades once again.

Clothes were brought in from Paris to be modelled at the parades, which attracted some hundreds of people from a very wide area to each show staged in the Winter Gardens Pavilion.

The tradition of the parades is continued today with shows staged twice yearly at the firm’s showrooms in High Street. They still draw large and appreciative audiences, not only from Weston but from a wide area around.

This month sees a special effort on the part of Trevors to aid the Freedom from Hunger Campaign. In conjunction with Weston Ladies’ Circle they are providing the clothes for a mannequin parade being staged at the Royal Hotel in Weston September 20th.

Trevors have a reputation for stocking a large variety and range of clothes of good quality from leading manufacturers. Budget price goods are on display along with exclusive model gowns from top designers.

Mr. Trevor, who personally supervises the buying of all goods sold in his store, says he finds his trade in Weston-super-Mare presents him with some special problems. His customers include

Art Comes in Many Forms

Art Comes in Many Forms
When I’m lucky enough to get work, and I’m not selling furniture or cleaning surgical centers, or hawking my watercolor or pen & ink paintings, this is what I’m busy doing. Since 1998 I’ve had a small, accessory design workroom called "Procreation". I specialize in custom pillows, and have worked for something like 40 decorators.

For the last three years, design work of any kind has been scarce, as has anything having to do with home dec, or the real estate market. Whereas I used to make about $7000 on the side a year just making pillows part time, now that figure is less than $1500. In my area, decorators have been going out of business, closing their shops, and working from their homes. Many have gotten into other lines of work, selling blinds, or more necessary items. Because I don’t do large things like draperies or upholstery, it’s hit or miss for me. Drapery workrooms are still scraping by, only because the retail market can’t produce custom sizes for the gi-normous three story windows some houses down here have, and upholsterers are still hanging on by a thread because people who had the sense to purchase furniture before cheapo furniture stores started mass producing disposable furniture in China have kept their good quality stuff and know that they can’t replace it with equal quality furniture without paying thousands of dollars. Re-upholstery is still the choice of those who want to have quality furnishings with a quality matched upholstery job, and better fabric than what is offered in retail. It might seem a good deal to purchase a sofa and loveseat for $2000, but generally, it’s already falling apart before the payments are made! For the same price, a good upholsterer can redo the existing pieces and they’ll last for many years.

When discount and closeout stores started marketing pillows for next to nothing, my business collapsed. Pillows, unlike upholstery and drapery, are not necessities. Well, at least not to most folks! Still, you won’t find the quality out there in retail, if that means anything to you. Unfortunately, our society has gone the way of fast food. Instant (and cheap) gratification is what people look for now, and many don’t have any concept of the kind of quality they SHOULD be able to expect. Obviously, there’s a difference between a Timex and a Rolex, and there is certainly a difference between Rooms to Go and Henredon, but a lot of people don’t care anymore. It isn’t even about price, really. You can buy used furniture with a good frame and recover it for the same price as the cheap stuff, but it’s more of an inconvenience. People want things NOW. It’s rather sad, but our world has changed, and without realizing it, many people have settled for poor quality without realizing they should DEMAND something for their hard earned money! It’s just easier not to make waves and settle.

So, I’m on a mission to convince people that they don’t have to be rich to bring a little art and quality into their lives! Remember your neighbors who work hard to produce good quality products. Support them. The few dollars you save as the small shops go out of business is the reason why China is rich and we are practically slipping into a depression! People can’t earn a decent wage, and all our money goes to imports. It’s better to save a little longer, and keep our economy going, keeping small businesses (like me!) up and running. It’s that, or decide whether you want to learn Cantonese or Mandarin….

Okay…before anyone jumps down my throat…I am not someone who thinks America is better than everyone else. I don’t have a problem with trade. I DO have a problem when trade is putting everyone out of work and causing economic hardship for millions of people, forcing them to not be able to afford anything BUT imported items, continuing the vicious cycle. I’d like to know just what China imports from US! There was a news report on one night a while back where one of the reporters went to Walmart and counted how many things WEREN’T from China. Out of hundreds of items, he found about TWO! Seriously, what IS made here anymore?

I especially love the people who love to argue that we shouldn’t buy foreign cars. Well, Toyotas are made here, but many American cars are made overseas now! It’s a joke. And don’t get me started on all the call centers that are in places like India! (Have you seen the commercial for a credit card company where a Russian guy answers from his house, supposedly a call center, and says his name is "Peggy"? It’s hysterical, or at least it would be if it weren’t true!)

Okay…end of rant…..

drapery workroom price

The Art Of Dressmaking At Home And In The Workroom
This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.